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Contractors donate more than $20,000 to rip up plastic netting in Parkville’s wetlands

Contractors donate more than $20,000 to rip up plastic netting in Parkville’s wetlands

The plastic netting covering Parkville’s wetlands project will be gone by spring after city officials approved a $29,140 donation to remove the potentially hazardous material on the contractor’s dime.  The netting is the most visible of several problems with the wetland restoration project in Platte Landing Park that the city of Parkville and U.S. Army…

Does a past criminal conviction bar you from serving on a board or commission? Not in KCMO.

Does a past criminal conviction bar you from serving on a board or commission? Not in KCMO.

Every year, the mayor of Kansas City, Missouri, appoints hundreds of people to the city’s dozens of boards and commissions, which give ordinary citizens a voice in everything from city planning to liquor control. Those appointments keep Alphia Curry constantly busy. As the city’s boards and commissions manager, she’s responsible for compiling information on dozens…

Dry ground and unmet promises: Parkville’s wetlands project is dead in the water

Dry ground and unmet promises: Parkville’s wetlands project is dead in the water

A wide expanse of plastic netting sits partially buried by dirt and vegetation in Parkville’s Platte Landing Park. Intended as the base of an ongoing wetlands restoration project, the netting has instead become an expensive — and dangerous — nuisance. The City of Parkville in 2017 signed an agreement to participate in a restoration project…

How an ordinance over bike lanes became a flashpoint for conversations about Kansas City infrastructure

How an ordinance over bike lanes became a flashpoint for conversations about Kansas City infrastructure

It began with a Kansas City Council member’s concerns about bike lanes and their place in the long list of needs in Kansas City’s often overlooked, less-affluent neighborhoods. Those concerns coalesced into a proposed piece of legislation that included language calling for the city to remove existing bike lanes if neighborhood associations did not want…

‘I still haven’t been allowed to live’: Ex-KCKFD firefighter left in financial limbo after discrimination verdict

‘I still haven’t been allowed to live’: Ex-KCKFD firefighter left in financial limbo after discrimination verdict

In April, ex-KCK firefighter Jyan Harris won a racial discrimination lawsuit in federal court against his old employer, the Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kansas. A federal jury awarded him $2.4 million in damages, money that Harris needs to support his family. Eight months later, Harris hasn’t seen a cent. “In some…

KCMO auditor looking into city board and commission conflicts of interest

KCMO auditor looking into city board and commission conflicts of interest

Are all of Kansas City’s board and commission members filling out required conflict of interest forms? Do those forms include the necessary questions to determine whether a conflict exists? The Kansas City, Missouri, auditor’s office is now examining those questions in a new audit that’s a follow-up to a 2019 inquiry that found multiple VisitKC…

‘Survey was not scientific by any means’: KCPD relies on officers self-reporting COVID-19 vaccination status

‘Survey was not scientific by any means’: KCPD relies on officers self-reporting COVID-19 vaccination status

No one knows how many Kansas City, Missouri, Police Department employees are vaccinated against COVID-19. Not the city, which relies on officers to interact with the public when responding to calls, or the department itself, which doesn’t require officers to get vaccinated.  In a Tuesday meeting of the Finance, Governance and Public Safety Committee, KCPD…

Kansas City declared a climate emergency. Now what?

Kansas City declared a climate emergency. Now what?

It’s been 13 years since Kansas City, Missouri, passed its first climate protection plan. At the top of the list: drastically reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Now the city is preparing a new plan, and emission reductions remains a focus.  In 2008, the city set a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 30% below 2000…

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